Immanuel College

Jewish Studies

 

Imagine a school where pupils have a love for Jewish practice and traditions.

Immanuel College Preparatory School offers a broad and balanced modern orthodox Jewish education, which gives pupils a detailed understanding of Jewish customs and practices, access to and understanding of Biblical and Rabbinical texts and a love for Israel. The school curriculum reflects the rich and varied rhythms of the Jewish year, giving children the opportunity to both study and experience first-hand the excitement of baking matza, writing a mezuzah, hearing the megilla on Purim and lighting Chanukah candles.

The Preparatory School days begins with tefilla (prayers) and the children learn to navigate their way around the siddur, so that they know both how to pray and what to say each day. They learn to read Aleph Bet from Reception and are taught the skills required to gain an understanding of Hebrew texts and gain confidence in asking questions and interacting with their Jewish heritage. A weekly Shabbat assembly is held, with parents invited to join the youngest children and the children are encouraged to bring a penny for tzedakah (charity) each day as well as being involved in larger projects with Shevat Achim, the charitable programme in the Senior School. The curriculum teaches children the history of the Jewish people and about the centrality of Israel.

Jewish education at Immanuel College Preparatory School is exciting, inspiring and relevant. Links are made through cross-curricula planning, so the children can find themselves designing and making a noise maker in Design & Technology which they find has a practical use when they study Halacha (Jewish Law). Parents are encouraged to join the celebrations, such as the Mock Seder and Yom Ha'atzmaut celebrations.

You do not just have to imagine the scenario. ISI found that "pupils outstanding levels of confidence, self-identity and spiritual awareness derive from the embodiment of the Jewish faith and its values" from the youngest age. (November 2013)